‘Tis the Season

A story came across my timeline on Facebook this morning about Toys R Us stores in the United Kingdom* planning a “quiet hour” of shopping for individuals on the autism spectrum (see the original story here). I expect that we’ll see more stories like this each holiday season, beginning with the stories I have already seen about Halloween accommodations and continuing through the annual autism-friendly Santa visits. I am┬áboth thrilled and frustrated by the growth of these events.

You’re probably wondering why I would feel any frustration over what is obviously a well-meaning plan for inclusion, and part of me would agree with you. I believe that any effort which involves adapting to others’ differences and allowing them to have the same experiences as their neurotypical peers is a good thing. Every story like this raises awareness of the needs of some of our population. Notice however, that I am not saying it necessarily serves the needs of the autism population.

For some, it does; but not for all. It has been said that if you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism. Making the connection between sensory needs and autism, while understandable, is also reductive. For example, Cheeks is hypo sensory in some aspects and hyper in others (hypo sensory being under sensitive to stimuli and therefore one seeks sensory input, hyper sensory being overly sensitive and one avoids it). Creating an environment for him such as the one described in this article would be both a hit and a miss.

The larger issue, in my opinion, is making any assumptions about the needs of someone with autism. It’s true that there are diagnostic criteria for autism, and so a certain set of expectations about the needs of these individuals is fair enough. But it’s worth considering too, that there are many people with sensory needs who are not on the autism spectrum, who would be well served by this offering but don’t read further than the word autism in the title.

quotescover-jpg-30Much like not everyone with a physical disability needs a ramp, not everyone with autism needs low lighting and quiet. It’s incumbent on a host such as Toys R Us and others to make the offer, but then to allow the potential audience to self-identify whether it meets their need. Calling it an autism event sets it aside as different and separate, which is the opposite of inclusion.

True inclusion will come when we see the diversity of any population and address varying needs, rather than labeling it and by so doing, inadvertently demonstrating a limited understanding of the need. When those within the autism community create an event such as this, it’s called “sensory friendly”, not specifically for autism. Sensory friendly is created to address both hyper sensory and hypo sensory elements.

I truly applaud the people and organizations that show a heightened awareness of neurological diversity. I will also continue to advocate until this is the rule rather than the exception. Toys R Us and others are making great first steps.

* This event is currently only planned in the U.K., Toys R Us has not yet committed to doing anything similar in the United States or elsewhere.