Let’s See Who You REALLY Are…

I have recently started homeschooling Cheeks. The main reason for this is that the public school system refused to accommodate Cheeks’ spelling to communicate, because it is not yet an evidence-based academic methodology. This created numerous disparities in what they believed to true about his cognitive ability; and in turn, how they taught him.

We know that Cheeks is intellectually competent to be just what he is, 11 years old and learning at a 5th grade level. In school, he was being taught at approximately the 1st or 2nd grade level based primarily on his inability to speak or write correct answers. His most recent work samples sent home last month had him writing the words hot-pot-robot; answering reading comprehension questions from a three sentence paragraph; and doing two-digit addition and subtraction.

In our lessons at home, we are jumping in at a 5th grade level in most subjects. Core subjects such as history, science, and language arts can all be taught starting with any topic; and presenting the lesson at a 5th grade level of complexity. As it turns out, Cheeks loves to spell long, challenging words: his recent vocabulary in home lessons has included “hieroglyphics”, “archaeologist”, “xylem”, and “anesthesia”, among others. (Note: I was a state-level spelling champion in sixth grade, but spell check had to correct two of those words for me as I typed this post. He got them right on the first try.)

The exception in terms of the difficulty level I present to him is math, because the concepts build on one another as you progress through the subject. If you’ve never had 3rd grade math, you can’t really jump in at 5th grade. So for that area alone, I was preparing to teach at a more basic level. I spent the last three weeks researching methods to teach math facts in a fun way: one that would allow him to learn what he needs to know but did not teach it in a way that would talk down to a 5th grader, who in ordinary circumstances would have learned them much earlier. I bought and borrowed books, read lesson plans, and studied everything I could find.

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Me, planning to teach Cheeks’ his multiplication facts.

Two nights ago at bedtime, on a whim, I decided to ask Cheeks if he already knows his times tables. He answered yes. I was surprised, but his speech can often be unreliable, and he says things that are not what he means to say. So I didn’t know if his answer was intentional. The next morning I still had all my books and lessons ready to go, and we sat down to start learning multiplication.

I warmed up his motor skills by giving him some of his beloved long words: “multiplication,” “accelerated addition,” and “mathematical.” I switch to the number board and this followed:

Me:  What’s 4×4?
Cheeks:  (body language reflecting total confidence)  [points to 1, then 6 on the board]
Me: (thinks to self “What the…? Must have been an easy one for him.”)  OK, what’s 7×5?
Cheeks: [points to 3, then 5]
Me:  (???????)  What’s 9×9?!
Cheeks: (looks at me as if I have three heads)  [points to 8, then 1]
Me:  ~laughs like a giddy little girl~
Cheeks: Can I be all done now?
Me: (still giggling)  Yes buddy, you can be all done. You’ve earned the day off. I’m sorry I didn’t understand when you said you already knew all this.

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Me, after realizing I didn’t have to teach him.

It felt a little like that moment in the Scooby Doo cartoons when the characters say, “Let’s see who you REALLY are” before pulling off the ghost’s mask to find Old Man Jenkins up to a nefarious scheme.

I have never been so happy about the massive waste of my time all that lesson planning turned out to be. And I shouldn’t have been surprised by this. I am being reminded every day of how much he does know, and after all, he told me he knew this too. I just thought since it had never been expressly taught to him, how could he know it? There should be a name for how a person feels when they are both surprised but not surprised. Maybe I will ask Cheeks what that word is, he’s clearly more likely to know it than I am.

In the meantime, I caution those reading this to assume that he’s extra-smart in math simply because he’s autistic. Maybe he is, or maybe he’s not. That assumption is based on stereotypes that have actually inhibited our understanding of him until now, so let’s reject those. Better to presume his competence, provide his tools, and then get out of his way while he shows us who he is.

Come to think of it, that’s pretty much what all parents and teachers should do for their kids, autism or not. Imagine that.

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2 thoughts on “Let’s See Who You REALLY Are…

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