‘Tis the Season

A story came across my timeline on Facebook this morning about Toys R Us stores in the United Kingdom* planning a “quiet hour” of shopping for individuals on the autism spectrum (see the original story here). I expect that we’ll see more stories like this each holiday season, beginning with the stories I have already seen about Halloween accommodations and continuing through the annual autism-friendly Santa visits. I am both thrilled and frustrated by the growth of these events.

You’re probably wondering why I would feel any frustration over what is obviously a well-meaning plan for inclusion, and part of me would agree with you. I believe that any effort which involves adapting to others’ differences and allowing them to have the same experiences as their neurotypical peers is a good thing. Every story like this raises awareness of the needs of some of our population. Notice however, that I am not saying it necessarily serves the needs of the autism population.

For some, it does; but not for all. It has been said that if you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism. Making the connection between sensory needs and autism, while understandable, is also reductive. For example, Cheeks is hypo sensory in some aspects and hyper in others (hypo sensory being under sensitive to stimuli and therefore one seeks sensory input, hyper sensory being overly sensitive and one avoids it). Creating an environment for him such as the one described in this article would be both a hit and a miss.

The larger issue, in my opinion, is making any assumptions about the needs of someone with autism. It’s true that there are diagnostic criteria for autism, and so a certain set of expectations about the needs of these individuals is fair enough. But it’s worth considering too, that there are many people with sensory needs who are not on the autism spectrum, who would be well served by this offering but don’t read further than the word autism in the title.

quotescover-jpg-30Much like not everyone with a physical disability needs a ramp, not everyone with autism needs low lighting and quiet. It’s incumbent on a host such as Toys R Us and others to make the offer, but then to allow the potential audience to self-identify whether it meets their need. Calling it an autism event sets it aside as different and separate, which is the opposite of inclusion.

True inclusion will come when we see the diversity of any population and address varying needs, rather than labeling it and by so doing, inadvertently demonstrating a limited understanding of the need. When those within the autism community create an event such as this, it’s called “sensory friendly”, not specifically for autism. Sensory friendly is created to address both hyper sensory and hypo sensory elements.

I truly applaud the people and organizations that show a heightened awareness of neurological diversity. I will also continue to advocate until this is the rule rather than the exception. Toys R Us and others are making great first steps.

* This event is currently only planned in the U.K., Toys R Us has not yet committed to doing anything similar in the United States or elsewhere.

Holiday Gift Giving to Autistic Kids

Screen Shot 2015-11-10 at 9.29.57 PMThe calendar may say early November, but the holidays are around the corner—ready or not, here they come.

At this time of year, those of us with kids in our lives find ourselves wondering what might make a good holiday gift. But a child with a communication disorder such as autism can’t always tell us. Or they may have trouble figuring out that even though we’re asking now, the gift doesn’t come until later. They might struggle to understand why they can’t expect to receive everything they asked for. In some cases, a child with autism may even ask for something that is impossible to deliver. For example, Cheeks once wanted his left thumb placed on the other side of his palm, next to his pinkie. Although I think that was just a Tuesday, not a holiday wish. And no, I still don’t know why.

Having autism doesn’t make kids alike in any way I can predict, so this isn’t a gift guide. But there are definitely some recommendations I can make about the context of your choices.

If the child you want to give a gift to a child that has focused interests (read: obsession), it might seem like the natural place to start. I urge caution. For example, Cheeks is currently very into superheroes, especially Batman. But three months ago, it was Scooby Doo. A few months before that, it was classic cartoons such as Tom & Jerry or Wile E. Coyote. Batman might not be in vogue anymore by December 25th; you might have heard there’s a little Star Wars moving coming out that could be a hit with him and a few other people. His interests are narrow, but deep, and they come in cycles. I can’t predict where we are in the cycle. If you want to choose a gift for any autistic child in your life, please don’t rely on surprises. Ask the parent to tell you outright what would be a good choice.

NO clothes! I can’t stress this enough. Most kids don’t love opening up socks and underwear on Christmas morning anyway. But the sensory challenges presented by autism mean that tags, textures, seams, colors, sizes, sleeve length, and even more are all at risk of being completely wrong. And don’t mean wrong as in, less preferred but still could be worn on laundry day when nothing else is clean. I mean it will be untouchable, not permitted even within potential eyesight of the child. I am not exaggerating. Better to avoid this category altogether.

If you like to give educational gifts, then keep mind what I have said on this blog about presuming competence. However, there are areas of developmental ability in autistic kids that are not in sync with their age. I know Cheeks has all the cognitive ability of his ten-year old peer group, but he does not have a similar communication ability. He comes home with library books from school written for a child in kindergarten, because that’s what his reading level seems like when he expresses himself. And—brace yourself for this shocker—my 4th grader isn’t interested in kindergarten books. On the other hand, he might love a sensory toy that to an outsider looks like something designed for preschoolers, because the sensory experience is calming to him. The point is, you can’t follow age guidelines in the same way as you can with typically developing kids. Talk to someone who knows the child’s abilities. If you want the gift to be a surprise to the parent too (which I don’t recommend, but there may be good reasons), then seek out a teacher, therapist, or other caregiver who knows the child well.

quotescover-JPG-85Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, please let go of the expectation that your gift will be greeted by a face lit up with holiday joy. I know it’s one of the best parts of gift giving, but emotional responses are difficult for autistic kids. It doesn’t mean they don’t feel the joy, it only means they don’t know how to express it. And if the gift misses the mark, you may hear about it in a way that would be considered rude coming from another child. Let it go, and let your real gift be compassion and understanding, and not what’s inside the box.